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Brave New Shakespeare Challenge - KING LEAR in ASL
Brave New Shakespeare Challenge - KING LEAR
Brave New Shakespeare Challenge - KING LEAR
On KING LEAR and Shakespeare

Week #7 - BRAVE NEW SHAKESPEARE CHALLENGE.

For our seventh week we challenge you to interpret and share:

We’ve invited actors Linda BoveF. Murray Abraham, and Okwui Okpokwasili to share their interpretations of this famous passage.

KING LEAR
Act Three, Scene Four

WATCH: Check out the videos from our Public Theater family for inspiration on this page. 
CREATE: Get inspired! Act, sing, rewrite, translate, paint, dance – whatever moves you!
CAPTURE: Record a video or snap a photo of your work. 
SHARE: Post your interpretation and share it with us and challenge your friends! Tag @PublicTheaterNY on Twitter and Instagram or @publictheater on Facebook, and be sure to use the hashtag #BraveNewShakespeare.
BONUS POINTS: Tag a friend who you think is up for the challenge. 

KING LEAR, ACT THREE, SCENE FOUR.

KING LEAR
By William Shakespeare
Act Three, Scene Four



LEAR
Prithee, go in thyself. Seek thine own ease.
This tempest will not give me leave to ponder....

Read the full passage here

Dive Deeper.

WATCH this conversation with this week’s participants, F. Murray Abraham, Linda Bove, and Okwui Okpokwasili, about King Lear, the various storms that shake societies, deaf theater, the role of art in a time of crisis, and MORE, here.

Shakespeare Thoughts.

From James Shapiro, Shakespeare Scholar in Residence at The Public Theater.

Many leading Elizabethan dramatists ended up in trouble, and some in prison, for writing something politically provocative. While Shakespeare escaped that fate, he is doing something unusually daring at this moment in King Lear: dramatizing a moment when a ruler acknowledges how lacking in empathy he has been, and how oblivious to the suffering of his poor, hungry, and homeless subjects. We can only wonder what King James thought of this scene when Shakespeare’s company performed the play at court in December 1606.   In this scene, King Lear—shelterless on the heath in a storm, and losing his wits—realizes for the first time in his long life that has taken “too little care” of the suffering of the needy. This in turn leads him to recognize the injustice of income inequality. When Lear says “Take physic pomp,” he means that the pompous ought to have a taste of this medicine; if they exposed themselves to the suffering of the poor, the rich would surely “shake the superflux to them,” that is, share their surplus and excessive wealth. It is rightly considered one of the most searing and memorable passages in Shakespeare’s works.

Resources and Links.

READ ALL OF SHAKESPEARE FOR FREE AT THE FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY ONLINE!